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Unenthralled

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Petyr had never held with the whole ‘thrall’ business. It had been useful when humans were nomadic and hard to come by, yes, but there had been cities for thousands of years now. That Vlad character had brought it back into fashion, but really, Viago and Deacon were just playing games with their food and it wasn’t dignified. It made one look pathetic, to spend time with humans recreationally, even if they were the sworn servant of your immortal darkness. If you wanted a friend, you should just make another vampire.

Petyr prided himself on the good choices he made whenever he turned someone; after all, he and Deacon were still friends today. And even though his features had made hunting difficult since the Iron Age, he’d still resisted killing that Nick fellow entirely. Everyone else in the house was a little grumpy about that, but Petyr liked the bad boy type. Vampire community life gets so old so fast, it’s good to have fresh blood, so to speak.

It’s only now that Petyr was suffering, for the first time since organised militaries were invented. Oh the bloodlust of being near something living yet off limits! It makes sense that Deacon, Vlad, and Viago had kept Nick’s human friend from him at first, seeing as Petyr would have ripped his throat out as soon as look at him, and still wanted to. But after his talk with Nick he was willing to give Stu a chance (largely because he was still feeling full from Nick himself not too long ago). He would try to move past his cynicism and bloodlust. After all, one does have to roll with the times – Petyr loved change.

“I work with informations systems,” Stu explained as the two of them hung out in Petyr’s room with Deacon and Vlad. “Compiling databases for clients, that sort of thing.”

I TOO HAVE BEEN ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF INNOVATION, Petyr impresses on Stu with his mind. FIRST WHEN I SPREAD THE WORD ABOUT AGRICULTURE, BUT ALSO I WAS IN SOME EARLY FILMS. IT WAS A GOLDEN AGE OF CINEMA.

Stu nods. “That’s pretty neat.”

And then later, Stu unclogged the drain in Petyr’s room, the one that had got clogged up with hair and liver sometime in the fifties. He wasn’t even in a little thrall, it was just out of the kindness of his heart. What a guy. Petyr really liked that about him. Stu was the sort of person he could really see getting along with during the eternity that is damnation clawing at one’s immortal soul. Much easier to get along with than Viago, who got upset at the slightest bone pile and stomped about at all hours of the night and day. But Petyr had never had a conversation with someone about good reasons not to be a vampire before.

“Being a vegetarian isn’t about the food, it’s a lifestyle,” Stu explains. “Battery hens, umm, hoof-in-mouth disease. It’s not good for the animals.”

Petyr twists the fabric of reality to remove the cap from Stu’s beer.

“Oh, thanks mate,” Stu says. Petyr slightly inclines his head in response. Perhaps this once, he will allow himself to be friends with a non-vampire. Or perhaps the real vampires are the friends you make along the way.