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Clarke the Captive

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That evening, with much persuasion and a second opinion from Nyko, Clarke allowed Gustus to transfer Lexa to her own tent. With a more than irritated air about him, the man had promised Clarke he would send for her in the night if Lexa needed her. Regardless, Clarke mixed up some herbs to help with the pain for Lexa to take before she went to sleep and insisted that he give them to the Commander. 

Their first walk took place the next morning, and Clarke had barely slept. It hadn’t been her intention to worry about the Commander all night, but all she could manage to do was lie awake, worried that Lexa would send for her. She had tossed and turned until an hour of morning came that was acceptable for her to be awake.

Nyko had raised an eyebrow when she’d told him she had offered to take walks with the Commander, but had said nothing else, and Clarke was grateful. Instead, he watched with amusement as Clarke rushed through her morning routine, only taking the time to make sure she was presentable. She wasn’t sure why she was nervous, but she blamed it on not being able to check up on the Commander throughout the night.

The walk towards the visiting warriors section of the village went by faster than Clarke expected, as she practically flew through Ton DC. It had barely registered with her that she was speed walking towards the Commander’s tent, until she was abruptly stopped by Gustus who was guarding the it.

As she had become accustomed to in the few days since she had met him, the man grunted a greeting, and allowed her entrance with a glare.

When Clarke entered the tent, her eyes went to Lexa, who was seated on her throne. The image would have been a regal one for sure, if the Commander hadn't had a leg thrown over one of the arms, struggling with the buckle on her left boot.

The heavy steps Clarke took to announce her presence caused the woman’s head to shoot up in alarm.

“Commander?”

Lexa let out a sigh, gesturing to the unbuckled boot. “If you could. It's still hard to reach.”

With a slight smirk, Clarke drew closer and reached for the brunette’s leg. She quickly buckled the boot, taking extra effort to ignore the other woman’s gaze on her face. Stepping back, she cleared her throat.

“Shall we go?”

Lexa sat up straighter on the throne as she brought her leg back to the floor. With great effort, she stood from her seated position, and smoothed out the non-existent wrinkles on her pants.

“My original intention for coming here was to assess my warriors in this village. Perhaps a walk to the training fields would be good for today?”

“Lead the way, Commander.”

Leaving the tent, two women began their walk, a disgruntled Gustus in tow.

They found themselves in a comfortable silence as they walked. Lexa looked ahead and nodded occasionally at people they passed while Clarke watched her out of the corner of her eye.

It was somewhat fascinating to her, to watch the other woman interact with people. The Commander remained stoic, but with each person she greeted, a sense of warmth emanated from her. Her simple nod towards the villagers sent each one smiling, without her even saying a word.

Clarke’s admiration of the Commander was interrupted as the woman in question turned a little to speak to her, and Clarke desperately hoped her face wasn’t turning red.

“How long have you been among my people, Clarke?”

“A few months now, I guess.”

“And the sky. Do you miss it?” Lexa asked, and the other woman sighed.

“I did. When I first got here.” The blonde answered. “But Earth has so much more than I could’ve imagined. The Ark was so cold because there was no sun, and we didn’t have the food you have down here. Or animals. Or trees. When I first got here, all I could do was just stare at everything. I was just amazed at it.”

She paused and looked at the Commander, who was looking at her with such interest, as if the woman was hanging on every word. She blushed. “I’m sorry, I’m rambling. No, I don’t miss the sky. But I miss my mother. And my friends.”

Lexa looked away. “I’m sorry.”

“You have nothing to be sorry for, Heda.”

Their shared moment was broken, as they arrived at the field where the training grounds resided. Young warriors could be seen running through exercises while older warriors observed. Indra met them halfway, the warriors she’d been working with looking with wide eyes at the Commander.  

Clarke followed the two women around for what felt like the entire day. The other women paid little attention to her, speaking in quick and rapid Trigedasleng about strategies and statistics. Clarke struggled to keep up, before giving up all together. Instead, she focused entirely on watching Lexa for any signs that the exertion of energy was too much.  

When she noticed Lexa holding her hand against her side, she suggested to Lexa that perhaps they should call it a day. In turn, Lexa bid Indra goodbye and they went on their way.

“I would like to help you.”

“What do you mean?”

“The other Sky people. I would like to help you find them.” 

“Commander…” Clarke was at a loss for words. “That’s kind of you, but I can’t ask you to do that. Our peoples were at war before mine went missing. I don’t think many of yours would jump at the opportunity to help.”

Lexa nodded, and decided not to press the issue further. “Thank you for the walk, Clarke.”

Clarke bowed her head. “I will see you tomorrow, Heda.”

The Commander watched the other woman leave, before entering her tent. Clumsily, she sat in a chair, grasping her side. She looked at her personal guard, whose face held a look of concern. 

“I am fine, Gustus. Send Anya to me when she is free.”


 

After the morning walk, Lexa found that all energy she had woken up with was gone. She had attempted to write a message to be sent to Polis, regarding her journey, but had given up after her eyes had drifted shut for the third or fourth time.

When she awoke, it was to the loud clanging noise of Anya, setting out food on the large table in the middle of the tent.

Lexa stood, shuffling over to the other woman, stretching and letting out a yawn. “Anya, I need you to locate the Sky people.”

Anya paused. “You want me to do what?” She asked, confused at the woman’s wish.

“I need you to gather scouts and have them search the area where the Sky people were last seen. They came from the sky. I doubt they got too far from where they originally landed.” Lexa paused. “Perhaps they stumbled upon Azgeda, or Maunon.”

“I understood the first time.” Anya brought her hand up, stopping the other woman as they each sat down. “What changed? If you remember, you gave strict orders to let the Sky people go after they disappeared.”

“Yes, and now I am asking you to find them. You don’t need to know my reasoning.”

Anya studied her for a moment. “What did Clarke say to you today?”

“Anya.” Lexa warned.

Anya fell quiet for a moment, focusing on placing food on her plate.  “How was your journey here?”

“Aside from being shot?”

A sigh came from the older woman. Over the years she had been the recipient of Lexa’s sarcasm many times. She had come to understand that it was her first defense when upset. “Clarke saved your life, and you want to thank her. I understand that.”

Lexa refrained from rolling her eyes at her old mentor. “She has been kept among us for months and has done nothing but do the job you assigned to her. From what I know, she has not tried to escape. She has not caused trouble. She saved my life, and the least I can do is give her the knowledge that her people are alive.”

Anya shook her head. “All of this, and you have only spent one morning with her. Perhaps you should discontinue your daily walks.”

The Commander slammed the cup she had raised to her mouth down and steadied her breathing, looking down at her plate. Another thing Anya had seen her do many times when her anger was about to get the best of her.

“Clarke is a good woman and a good healer. I will do what you ask because twice now she has saved one of my seconds. But I must warn you to be careful with where you place your affections, Lexa.” 

“I have known her for less than 3 days, Anya.”

“That didn’t stop you last time, now did it?”